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Cochise
The House That Sugarcane Built
War and Genocide
Up Against the Wall
Mardi Gras, Gumbo, and Zydeco
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Sojourner Truth
America in the Fifties
Chicago's Greatest Year, 1893
America’s Deadliest Twister
John Cage

Bees in AmericaBees in America

How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation

Tammy Horn

Narrated by Laura Jennings

Approximately 10 hours

Unabridged


Downloadable edition:

buy from Audible


Book published by University Press of Kentucky


“Queen Bee,” “busy as a bee,” and “the land of milk and honey” are expressions that permeate the language within American culture. Music, movies, art, advertising, poetry, children’s books, and literature all incorporate the dynamic image of the tiny, industrious honey bee into our popular imagination. Honey bees—and the values associated with them—have influenced American values for four centuries. Bees and beekeepers have represented order and stability in a country without a national religion, political party, language, or family structure. Bees in America is an enlightening cultural history of bees and beekeeping in the United States. Tammy Horn, herself a beekeeper, offers a social and technological history from the colonial period, when the British first brought bees to the New World, to the present, when bees are being trained by the American military to detect bombs. Horn shows how the honey bee was one of the first symbols of colonization and how bees’ societal structures shaped our ideals about work, family, community, and leisure. In turn, the Puritan work ethic was modeled after the beehive, and this model continues to influence American definitions of success. Still a powerful symbol today, the honey bee is both a source of income and a metaphor for America’s place at the center of global advances in information and technology.

" Honey bees—and the qualities associated with them—have quietly influenced American values for four centuries. During every major period in the country's history, bees and beekeepers have represented order and stability in a country without a national religion, political party, or language. Bees in America is an enlightening cultural history of bees and beekeeping in the United States. Tammy Horn, herself a beekeeper, offers a varied social and technological history from the colonial period, when the British first introduced bees to the New World, to the present, when bees are being used by the American military to detect bombs. Early European colonists introduced bees to the New World as part of an agrarian philosophy borrowed from the Greeks and Romans. Their legacy was intended to provide sustenance and a livelihood for immigrants in search of new opportunities, and the honey bee became a sign of colonization, alerting Native Americans to settlers' westward advance. Colonists imagined their own endeavors in terms of bees' hallmark traits of industry and thrift and the image of the busy and growing hive soon shaped American ideals about work, family, community, and leisure. The image of the hive continued to be popular in the eighteenth century, symbolizing a society working together for the common good and reflecting Enlightenment principles of order and balance. Less than a half-century later, Mormons settling Utah (where the bee is the state symbol) adopted the hive as a metaphor for their protected and close-knit culture that revolved around industry, harmony, frugality, and cooperation. In the Great Depression, beehives provided food and bartering goods for many farm families, and during World War II, the War Food Administration urged beekeepers to conserve every ounce of beeswax their bees provided, as more than a million pounds a year were being used in the manufacture of war products ranging from waterproofing products to tape. The bee remains a bellwether in modern America. Like so many other insects and animals, the bee population was decimated by the growing use of chemical pesticides in the 1970s. Nevertheless, beekeeping has experienced a revival as natural products containing honey and beeswax have increased the visibility and desirability of the honey bee. Still a powerful representation of success, the industrious honey bee continues to serve both as a source of income and a metaphor for globalization as America emerges as a leader in the Information Age.

Tammy Horn was raised with beekeepers on both sides of her family. She is the director of Coal Country Beeworks, a multi-service project in which surface mine sites are reclaimed with pollinator habitat in eastern Kentucky.

REVIEWS:

“A fascinating and very readable cultural history of bees and beekeeping in the United States.”

Choice

“You will love this book .... That honey bees helped shape America cannot be disputed. Here are many of the ways they worked their magic. ”

Bee Culture

“I think it is great that Horn has written a book on beekeeping history that will appeal to the general public, as well as beekeepers. I know that U.S. beekeepers will be grateful that Tammy Horn is sharing the story of their love affair with [the] honey bee to the general population. I can't help but believe that after reading Horn's book, more people will be stimulated to explore the wonderful world of beekeeping! Bees in America is a welcome respite from our fast-paced, technology-driven society.”

— Joe Graham, editor of American Bee Journal

“This excellent example of the effects agriculture has on history will be a welcome addition. ”

Booklist

“Horn shows the potential for cultural studies to reach out in new directions&will appeal to non-specialist audiences&entertaining and informative. ”

Appalachian Journal




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University Press Audiobooks